With a tally of 25 medals, Michael Phelps is the most decorated Olympian of all time. The swimming champion made a splash with his Rio Olympics 2016 debut on Sunday night, helping the United States clench gold in the 4x100m freestyle relay, but he’s also been making waves with those weird circular bruises across his body. As it turns out, the bruises are caused by cupping therapy, an ancient Chinese healing practice.

What Is Cupping Therapy?

“The therapy is intended to increase blood circulation to the treatment area with the aim of relieving muscle soreness and facilitating faster recovery”
Cupping therapy involves the placement of specialized cups on the skin surface to lift the skin slightly away from the underlying muscle, either with suction or heat. The therapy just takes a few minutes, but that’s enough to do the job. The separation of skin causes a rupture of blood capillaries just beneath the skin, giving you those hard-to-forget purple bruises. The therapy is intended to increase blood circulation to the treatment area with the aim of relieving muscle soreness and facilitating faster recovery. Olympians like Michael Phelps, Natalie Coughlin, Alex Naddour, and Pavel Sankovich, among others, swear by therapy, insisting that it has helped them significantly.

What Is Cupping Therapy?

“The therapy is intended to increase blood circulation to the treatment area with the aim of relieving muscle soreness and facilitating faster recovery”
Cupping therapy involves the placement of specialized cups on the skin surface to lift the skin slightly away from the underlying muscle, either with suction or heat. The therapy just takes a few minutes, but that’s enough to do the job. The separation of skin causes a rupture of blood capillaries just beneath the skin, giving you those hard-to-forget purple bruises. The therapy is intended to increase blood circulation to the treatment area with the aim of relieving muscle soreness and facilitating faster recovery. Olympians like Michael Phelps, Natalie Coughlin, Alex Naddour, and Pavel Sankovich, among others, swear by therapy, insisting that it has helped them significantly.

Une publication partagée par Michael Phelps (@m_phelps00) le





Does Cupping Therapy Really Work?

Although there isn’t much evidence yet to back up therapy, some experts believe that the benefits may be explained by an immune response triggered by cupping”
While there’s no doubt about the great faith that athletes and coaches place in the therapy, medical science is based on evidence not faith, and there isn’t much evidence yet to back up therapy. However, some experts believe that the benefits may be explained by an immune response that is inadvertently triggered. Apparently, by causing local inflammation the immune system may be encouraged to produce cytokines that help enhance intra-cellular communication and modulate immune response.
Two studies on patients with chronic neck pain and knee arthritis also reported some pain relief and muscle relaxation benefits, but researchers could not rule out the placebo effect.

So Why Is Cupping Therapy Popular With Olympians?

With strict monitoring for doping, any therapy or practice that gives you a competitive edge, even if purely psychological, can be a huge benefit”
It’s actually no surprise that cupping therapy is so popular with Olympians. Cupping therapy, like many other alternative healing practices is legal for athletes, as it has no demonstrable physiological effect and poses no risk (if you don’t mind those unsightly purple bruises). In the context of highly competitive sports with strict monitoring for doping, any therapy or practice that gives you a competitive edge, even if purely psychological, can be a huge benefit.
So, if you’re placing all your hopes on this seemingly miraculous therapy that Olympians love, we’d advise you to approach it with a healthy dose of skepticism, until there’s more science to support the purported health benefits of cupping therapy.




Source: thehealthorange.com

What Is “Cupping Therapy” And Why Are Olympians Doing It



With a tally of 25 medals, Michael Phelps is the most decorated Olympian of all time. The swimming champion made a splash with his Rio Olympics 2016 debut on Sunday night, helping the United States clench gold in the 4x100m freestyle relay, but he’s also been making waves with those weird circular bruises across his body. As it turns out, the bruises are caused by cupping therapy, an ancient Chinese healing practice.

What Is Cupping Therapy?

“The therapy is intended to increase blood circulation to the treatment area with the aim of relieving muscle soreness and facilitating faster recovery”
Cupping therapy involves the placement of specialized cups on the skin surface to lift the skin slightly away from the underlying muscle, either with suction or heat. The therapy just takes a few minutes, but that’s enough to do the job. The separation of skin causes a rupture of blood capillaries just beneath the skin, giving you those hard-to-forget purple bruises. The therapy is intended to increase blood circulation to the treatment area with the aim of relieving muscle soreness and facilitating faster recovery. Olympians like Michael Phelps, Natalie Coughlin, Alex Naddour, and Pavel Sankovich, among others, swear by therapy, insisting that it has helped them significantly.

What Is Cupping Therapy?

“The therapy is intended to increase blood circulation to the treatment area with the aim of relieving muscle soreness and facilitating faster recovery”
Cupping therapy involves the placement of specialized cups on the skin surface to lift the skin slightly away from the underlying muscle, either with suction or heat. The therapy just takes a few minutes, but that’s enough to do the job. The separation of skin causes a rupture of blood capillaries just beneath the skin, giving you those hard-to-forget purple bruises. The therapy is intended to increase blood circulation to the treatment area with the aim of relieving muscle soreness and facilitating faster recovery. Olympians like Michael Phelps, Natalie Coughlin, Alex Naddour, and Pavel Sankovich, among others, swear by therapy, insisting that it has helped them significantly.

Une publication partagée par Michael Phelps (@m_phelps00) le





Does Cupping Therapy Really Work?

Although there isn’t much evidence yet to back up therapy, some experts believe that the benefits may be explained by an immune response triggered by cupping”
While there’s no doubt about the great faith that athletes and coaches place in the therapy, medical science is based on evidence not faith, and there isn’t much evidence yet to back up therapy. However, some experts believe that the benefits may be explained by an immune response that is inadvertently triggered. Apparently, by causing local inflammation the immune system may be encouraged to produce cytokines that help enhance intra-cellular communication and modulate immune response.
Two studies on patients with chronic neck pain and knee arthritis also reported some pain relief and muscle relaxation benefits, but researchers could not rule out the placebo effect.

So Why Is Cupping Therapy Popular With Olympians?

With strict monitoring for doping, any therapy or practice that gives you a competitive edge, even if purely psychological, can be a huge benefit”
It’s actually no surprise that cupping therapy is so popular with Olympians. Cupping therapy, like many other alternative healing practices is legal for athletes, as it has no demonstrable physiological effect and poses no risk (if you don’t mind those unsightly purple bruises). In the context of highly competitive sports with strict monitoring for doping, any therapy or practice that gives you a competitive edge, even if purely psychological, can be a huge benefit.
So, if you’re placing all your hopes on this seemingly miraculous therapy that Olympians love, we’d advise you to approach it with a healthy dose of skepticism, until there’s more science to support the purported health benefits of cupping therapy.




Source: thehealthorange.com

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